Kambale wins second Carlsberg golf title

After taking a break from scrutinising a pile of court documents at his office at the weekend, lawyer Gabriel Kambale invaded a 110-strong field at Country Club Limbe (CCL) with awesome shots to win his second annual title of the Carlsberg Malawi Open Golf Championship.

The handicapp-2 golfer carded two-under-par to win the stroke-play formatted championship with overall 142 points and put himself on record as the first golfer to have won the five-year-old annual event twice. He won his first Carlsberg championship category title in 2009.

However, Kambale passed through a jungle of exasperation before outwitting his biggest contender Paul Chidale with an eagle on the 17th hole.

After Chidale hit a birdie on this hole to clip the lead to two points, the lawyer was about to let the title slip away, but this rare stroke propelled him to the top of the ladder and pushed his challenger to the second slot by just a single point. Stanford Kayuni settled for the third position with seven points behind Kambale.

“Chidale had been my biggest threat right from the start of the event until I found comfort in the eagle on the 17th hole,” said Kambale after receiving his trophy from Carlsberg Malawi’s group marketing manager Gwynyth Mchiela on Sunday.

“But it is quite relieving that I have managed to add another Carlsberg championship title on my mantelpiece.”

Kassim Aroni won the division-A category of the competition with 158 points, four ahead of his runner-up John Magombo while John Suzi did it in the division-B event with 179 points. Ephraim Wen took the second spot with 162 points.

While thanking the CCL golf captain Gilbert Chirwa and his team for making the condition of the golf course immaculate, Mchiela thanked the golfers for coming in large numbers to patronise the event.

“We are happy with the participation in our fifth golf championship here. We therefore want to reaffirm our support for this competition that help to promote our brand,” Mchiela said.

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