Story of Jacaranda Museum of Ethnographic Objects

Chileka in Blantyre is renowne

Chileka in Blantyre is renowned for famous musicians such as Daniel and Donald Kachamba, Evison Matafale and the reggae outfit, Black Missionaries.

However, what most people do not know is that there is hidden treasure in Singano Village in Chileka.

Malamusi (R) showing visitors some of the instruments at the museum

Deriving its name from a jacaranda tree which was on the premises, the place is Jacaranda Museum for Ethnographic Objects.

Owned by Dr Moya Malamusi, an ethnologist, cultural anthropologist and musician, the museum is a place where African music instruments of all ages are found.

Described as extraordinary, the museum does not only keep music instruments related to music but also with healing.

The kalimba instrument, for instance, is known for its healing powers. It is a small instrument which when played creates a soothing and therapeutic sound.

Speaking in a telephone interview, Malamusi touted his museum as the only place in Malawi where one can find audio recordings and instruments that are now extinct.

He said: “A lot of people do not even know that the recordings being kept in the museum have even existed in Malawi.”

Despite being owned by an individual, there are a lot of ways in which the archives at the museum could be used to promote the place.

“There is need to introduce a module in the arts department of music at Chancellor College which will take students through the history of Malawian music,” said Malamusi.

Romeo Malamusi, who now takes care of the place, said Mangolongondo, Banjo, Bangwe and Nkangala have now become extinct and it is only a few old people who are able to play the traditional music instruments.

“One can ask why in Nigerian movies we see the youth playing their local music instruments, which were used by their ancestors, during traditional weddings or other gatherings, the answer is, that is their way of preserving the culture of music,” he said.

People such as Malamusi believe Malawi too can do the same.

d for famous musicians such as Daniel and Donald Kachamba, Evison Matafale and the reggae outfit, Black Missionaries.

However, what most people do not know is that there is hidden treasure in Singano Village in Chileka.

Deriving its name from a jacaranda tree which was on the premises, the place is Jacaranda Museum for Ethnographic Objects.

Owned by Dr Moya Malamusi, an ethnologist, cultural anthropologist and musician, the museum is a place where African music instruments of all ages are found.

Described as extraordinary, the museum does not only keep music instruments related to music but also with healing.

The kalimba instrument, for instance, is known for its healing powers. It is a small instrument which when played creates a soothing and therapeutic sound.

Speaking in a telephone interview, Malamusi touted his museum as the only place in Malawi where one can find audio recordings and instruments that are now extinct.

He said: “A lot of people do not even know that the recordings being kept in the museum have even existed in Malawi.”

Despite being owned by an individual, there are a lot of ways in which the archives at the museum could be used to promote the place.

“There is need to introduce a module in the arts department of music at Chancellor College which will take students through the history of Malawian music,” said Malamusi.

Romeo Malamusi, who now takes care of the place, said Mangolongondo, Banjo, Bangwe and Nkangala have now become extinct and it is only a few old people who are able to play the traditional music instruments.

“One can ask why in Nigerian movies we see the youth playing their local music instruments, which were used by their ancestors, during traditional weddings or other gatherings, the answer is, that is their way of preserving the culture of music,” he said.

People such as Malamusi believe Malawi too can do the same.

Share This Post