Art industry reacts to election ruling


Players in the arts industry have welcomed the presidential election case ruling delivered on Monday describing it as a huge relief.

During the post-election period a number of artists and event organisers were forced to suspend performances as the country was shrouded in a state of uncertainty with demonstrations fuelled by the prevailing political impasse taking centre stage.

One of the local artists, Lulu, said: “There was a time when everything was at a standstill. We could not schedule shows or do anything. That to me was the biggest drawback for the past year. We hope the situation will be different this year.”

Fumulani: We do not operate in a vacuum

On Monday a five-judge panel of the High Court of Malawi sitting as the Constitutional Court ordered fresh presidential elections to be held in 150 days.

Several artists that we interviewed randomly have said they hope the ruling by the court marks a new beginning.

Actress-cum-filmmaker Joyce Mhango-Chavula said many artists were forced to put on hold their projects and activities as some places had become unsafe. Body in support of primary school learnersActress-cum-filmmaker Joyce Mhango-Chavula said many artists were forced to put on hold their projects and activities as some places had become unsafe.

She said the ruling is an assurance for them to get back to work and continue from where they left off.

“This is where artists need to play their role. As politicians will be trying to get their campaign messages to the masses, there is an opportunity for us to get involved too.

“But we also need to work smart to avoid being exploited,” she said. 

Poet Robert Chiwamba said there was stagnation across all spheres in as far as business was concerned and the artistic world was not spared of the effects. He said the landmark ruling is a breath of fresh air for artists.

He said: “Art in itself had lost some attention with the entire country concentrating on the case. We hope people will now start leading their normal lives, attending our performances and giving feedback as they used to do.” Black Missionaries frontman Anjiru Fumulani said: “We do not operate in a vacuum and therefore, we cannot say that the goings-on were not affecting us. We are happy that the will of Malawians has been done and that everyone can play their part in developing this nation.”



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